Cloudinary Blog

Image Management Best Practices
 
There’s no debating the fact that including images on your website or mobile app draws the interest of users and leads to stronger engagement. For example, posts that include images produce 650 percent higher engagement than text-only posts, according to a WebDAM infographic. Use of attention-grabbing images is only going to grow. Consider that by 2018, 84 percent of communication will be visual, the infographic noted. 
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PHP File Upload - The Easy Way

There are lots of images and videos all over the internet. A lot of applications these days demand that the user is able to manipulate and upload files to the server. Thankfully, PHP provides the functions to handle file uploads. There are two main ways to handle file uploads with PHP: The barebones way, which includes building an HTML form that allows users to submit files, and then creating a PHP upload script to handle the files; and using Cloudinary’s solution.

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You're invited to ImageCon - the image management conference!

Images – if you’re a developer, there’s no doubt that at one time or another, you’ve probably worked with a lot of image files, and may have been tasked with ensuring a top-notch user experience or continually improving website and app performance. You may have posed questions on online message boards, or sought advice from your developer colleagues. But there hasn’t been a conference that solely focused on image management…until now.

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How to Optimize the Image Size for Your JQuery Image Slider

Have you ever noticed that home pages are slow to load? Sliders could be to blame. Many modern homepages use a slider or carousel design element to show several rotating images that provide different offers or present various aspects of the brand. A common choice for implementing these sliders is JQuery. While JQuery itself is not a performance killer, the large images displayed by the slider can be responsible for slowing down a home page’s load time.

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React.js Tutorial: How to develop a React library

Developing a library requires a different approach from developing an application. You must consider the use of the library in someone else’s application and design for it. React is well suited for this purpose. And if the library you are creating is an adapter to another library, you can dynamically generate the component's properties definition to ensure they are forward compatible. There is however more than one way to achieve the same goal, with some conventions to follow and others to cautiously not follow. In particular, I chose to use the context function even though it is an experimental feature because it is useful when you don’t know, or can’t dictate, the way your library's components will be utilized.

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