Cloudinary Blog

Meet The Visual Web: World’s Biggest Collection of Images and Rich Media Resources

Meet The Visual Web: World’s Biggest Collection of Images and Rich Media Resources

Image Source: Vecteezy

Images and video are a core component of websites, mobile apps and our digital life. They deliver exciting content and improve the user experience by delivering the best format, size and quality to meet each web visitor’s unique needs

At the same time, high-quality images and video can be a major challenge for site owners and developers who need to dynamically generate large volumes of images, store them, optimize them for quality and performance, and deliver them to users around the world in an instant.

As a developer, there’s no doubt you want to stay on the cutting-edge of new techniques and best practices for image and video management. You may want to know how to address particular challenges, such as the best way to achieve a desired effect, how to find a balance between image quality and site speed, or how to upload multiple images to different platforms. But often, you may have to bounce between sites and forums to find answers to your questions.

That’s why Cloudinary created The Visual Web. This online community is designed as a one-stop resource where you can discover what’s new in image and video management, and how to apply it to your own projects. Here you can learn more about various image and video formats, optimization, delivery, storage techniques, and best practices for media manipulation and adjustment for websites.

This Visual Web is a collaborative knowledge base that maps out the image and rich media management landscape. The site includes a carefully curated index of thousands of resources on a wide range of image, media and web development topics, written by leading bloggers, developers and technology experts.

Cloudinary took on this project to make the available content about media management easily accessible. The site started with an intensive research project – the first stage was building a tree of more than 300 sub-topics around image and video management, including media use cases, media management and operations, image delivery and content delivery networks (CDNs), image and video manipulation techniques and video formats and transcoding.

Visual Web

The Cloudinary team collected more than 100,000 web pages that cover these subjects, hand-picked the most relevant ones for each category, and divided them into “content types,” such as “how to” articles, real-life examples, vendor information and product comparisons.

The site currently includes about 70 pages of content and is growing fast! If you feel we left something out, let us know and we’ll add it to the list of resources.

Explore, learn and kindly spread the word!

Recent Blog Posts

Hipcamp Optimizes Images and Improves Page Load Times With Cloudinary

When creating a website that allows campers to discover great destinations, Hipcamp put a strong emphasis on featuring high-quality images that showcased the list of beautiful locations, regardless of whether users accessed the site on a desktop, tablet, or phone. Since 2015, Hipcamp has relied on Cloudinary’s image management solution to automate cropping and image optimization, enabling instant public delivery of photos, automatic tagging based on content recognition, and faster loading of webpages. In addition, Hipcamp was able to maintain the high standards it holds for the look and feel of its website.

Read more
New Image File Format: FUIF: Why Do We Need a New Image Format

In my last post, I introduced FUIF, a new, free, and universal image format I’ve created. In this post and other follow-up pieces, I will explain the why, what, and how of FUIF.

Even though JPEG is still the most widely-used image file format on the web, it has limitations, especially the subset of the format that has been implemented in browsers and that has, therefore, become the de facto standard. Because JPEG has a relatively verbose header, it cannot be used (at least not as is) for low-quality image placeholders (LQIP), for which you need a budget of a few hundred bytes. JPEG cannot encode alpha channels (transparency); it is restricted to 8 bits per channel; and its entropy coding is no longer state of the art. Also, JPEG is not fully “responsive by design.” There is no easy way to find a file’s truncation offsets and it is limited to a 1:8 downscale (the DC coefficients). If you want to use the same file for an 8K UHD display (7,680 pixels wide) and for a smart watch (320 pixels wide), 1:8 is not enough. And finally, JPEG does not work well with nonphotographic images and cannot do fully lossless compression.

Read more
 New Image File Format: FUIF:Lossy, Lossless, and Free

I've been working to create a new image format, which I'm calling FUIF, or Free Universal Image Format. That’s a rather pretentious name, I know. But I couldn’t call it the Free Lossy Image Format (FLIF) because that acronym is not available any more (see below) and FUIF can do lossless, too, so it wouldn’t be accurate either.

Read more
Optimizing Video Streaming and Delivery: Q&A with Doug Sillars

Doug Sillars, a digital nomad and a freelance mobile-performance expert, answers questions about video streaming and delivery, website optimization, and more.

Doug Sillars, a freelance mobile-performance expert and developer advocate, is a Google Developer Expert and the author of O’Reilly’s High Performance Android Apps. Given his extensive travels across the globe—from the UK to Siberia—with his wife, kids, and 11-year-old dog, Max, he has been referred to as a “digital nomad.” So far in 2018, Doug has spoken at more than 75 meetups and conferences!

Read more