Cloudinary Blog

Blog posts of 'Image-Management' tag
A Blueprint for AWS-Secured Webhook Listeners for Cloudinary

tl;dr: An AWS-secured and optimized Cloudinary webhook listener for extending the Cloudinary service

Code: Github

A webhook is a communication medium for sending notifications from one platform to another about events that occurred. In place are user-defined HTTP callbacks that are triggered by specific events. When a triggered event takes place on the source site, the webhook listens to the event, collects the data, and sends it to the URL you specified in the form of an HTTP request.

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Transformation Management Made Easy With Cloudinary

Transforming images with Cloudinary is simple, right? You find the ones you want and add them to your URL, building them up and trying them out until they’re perfect. You can then save the transformations that you created as named transformations for reuse. That final step sounds straightforward, but up until now has been a little tricky. With Cloudinary’s slick and new UI, creating and managing transformations through the Management Console just got even simpler. That UI now includes—

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React.js Tutorial: How to develop a React library

Developing a library requires a different approach from developing an application. You must consider the use of the library in someone else’s application and design for it. React is well suited for this purpose. And if the library you are creating is an adapter to another library, you can dynamically generate the component's properties definition to ensure they are forward compatible. There is however more than one way to achieve the same goal, with some conventions to follow and others to cautiously not follow. In particular, I chose to use the context function even though it is an experimental feature because it is useful when you don’t know, or can’t dictate, the way your library's components will be utilized.

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Create a Real-Time Photo Sharing Website in a Few Easy Steps
Two decades ago websites had such a simple usage flow. Web servers returned complete HTML pages and each user action required that a new HTML page be reloaded from the server. Later on Ajax joined the game allowing dynamic updating of specific web page fragments via simple Javascript requests to the server. Google's wide-spread use of Ajax with Gmail was simply mind blowing at the time. Today's product requirements wouldn't settle even for that.
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Can your users upload their own images to your web or mobile application? What about your content partners - do they upload their images directly to your service? 
 
We frequently hear complaints that as the service owner, you don't get enough visibility into the images uploaded to your service. In this blog post, we wanted to help you change that.
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