Cloudinary Blog

What Zedd, baked cookies and video management have in common

Cloudinary at AWS re:Invent 2015

Last week Cloudinary attended, and exhibited at, its first ever Amazon Web Services (AWS) re:Invent. The event was packed with a multitude of companies, promoting their products and enticing passers by into their booths with cool t-shirts mini robots and even freshly baked cookies. With a full team manning the booth, we perfected our pitch and attracted a steady stream of visitors. Even some of Cloudinary’s favorite customers stopped by to say hello! Redbull, Stylight and Accenture to name a few.


As we chatted with attendees about Cloudinary’s image and video management solution, perhaps the biggest question on their minds was how to best manage videos.  It shouldn’t come as a surprise that video is front of mind now, since the amount of video traffic is growing exponentially. According to the Cisco Visual Networking Index, consumer Internet video traffic will account for 80 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2019, up from 64 percent in 2014. In fact, according to the index, it would take an individual over 5 million years to watch the amount of video that will cross global IP networks each month in 2019, as it’s projected that every second, nearly a million minutes of video content will cross the network by that time.


Specifically what visitors to our booth wanted to know was the best ways to optimize video for web browsers and mobile devices, and how to transcode video so that when it is uploaded, it can be automatically converted to all relevant formats suitable for web viewing.


At our booth, we had the chance to explain how Cloudinary can easily help them address these significant challenges with our media upload API and URL-based video manipulation API. We enable them to embed video in websites using HTML5 video tags (or Flash), transcode and resize/manipulate videos to fit their website and then deliver these videos to users via a fast content delivery network (CDN).


During our demonstrations, we showed all the great features of Cloudinary’s video management service, including the ability to:


  • Stream videos to web browsers/mobile devices using simple HTTP URLs

  • Embed videos in web pages

  • Resize, trim and rotate videos

  • Adjust the video settings and apply effects

  • Create image thumbnails of any frame of the video

  • Add watermarks, image and video overlays

  • Manipulate and stream audio

  • Convert the video to an animated GIF

  • Upload media files via an API


But these aren’t the only things Cloudinary can do with video. For the full breadth of possibilities, check out our Video Manipulation and Delivery page or contact us at to see how we can help solve any problems you’re having with video.

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