Cloudinary Blog

Heroku add-on for image management in the cloud

When we first started developing web apps with Ruby on Rails, some six years ago, we struggled with finding a good IDE. We settled for Eclipse with RadRails (still developing on PCs at that time...), but kept our eyes open for new and promising IDEs. At late 2007, a very surprising contender caught our eyes, it was called ‘Heroku’ and it offered an amazing concept - a fully featured IDE for Ruby-on-Rails that was completely online, available through your favorite browser.

In addition to collaborative online code editing, Heroku sought to revolutionize the way you deploy your Rails applications. Instead of messing around with a lengthy deployment process, heroku offered to deploy your Rails applications to the cloud in just a few clicks.

The huge benefits for the Rails community has drove Heroku to focus its whole attention at Cloud-based deployments, offering one of the most effective PaaS (Platform as a service) solutions at that time. Heroku soon extended their support to Node.js, Clojure, Java, Python, and Scala.

Two years later, Heroku added yet another disruptive feature to their platform - add-ons. With add-ons, any cloud service provider could integrate with Heroku, offering its service through the Heroku platform. New add-ons get listed on Heroku’s portal, and Heroku users can extend their existing applications with new cloud services in virtually one click.

When we started working on Cloudinary, we knew that we must develop a Cloudinary add-on for Heroku. Allowing web developers to integrate with our Cloud-based image management solution with just a single click was simply a too important opportunity to miss. 

After a lengthy testing phase, we’re happy to report that the Cloudinary’s Heroku add-on is finally available to the general public

Notes

To setup a Cloudinary account, simply select the plan that matches your needs from the list of plans. You can upgrade to plans with higher usage limits at any time.

You can also do it from the command line. For example, the following line signs up to the Bronze plan:

heroku addons:add cloudinary:bronze

With Cloudinary’s client libraries for Ruby on Rails, Node.js and Python, integrating with Heroku is quite seamless. Heroku automatically defines the CLOUDINARY_URL environment variable in your deployed applications. This variable is processed by our client libraries for configuring your cloud name and access identifiers. Here is a sample CLOUDINARY_URL for example:

cloudinary://123456789012345:abcdeghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz12@n07t21i7

In addition, Cloudinary also offers straightforward URL-based APIs for simple integration with any web development platform out there.

Check out our Heroku documentation page for detailed usage instructions.  

After you setup your Cloudinary add-on, make sure you check out our Management Console. Through the console you can browse all uploaded images and transformations, view usage statistics and charts, grab your access identifiers and modify your account settings. To reach your management console, just head to the Heroku portal, select your app, and select Cloudinary from the Add-ons drop-down menu on the top right corner. 

Heroku Menu

Console

Heroku users - why don't you try out our new add-on? We would love to hear your feedback.

Recent Blog Posts

Build the Back-End For Your Own Instagram-style App with Cloudinary

Github Repo

Managing media files (processing, storage and manipulation) is one of the biggest challenges we encounter as practical developers. These challenges include:

A great service called Cloudinary can help us overcome many of these challenges. Together with Cloudinary, let's work on solutions to these challenges and hopefully have a simpler mental model towards media management.

Read more

Build A Miniflix in 10 Minutes

By Prosper Otemuyiwa
Build A Miniflix in 10 Minutes

Developers are constantly faced with challenges of building complex products every single day. And there are constraints on the time needed to build out the features of these products.

Engineering and Product managers want to beat deadlines for projects daily. CEOs want to roll out new products as fast as possible. Entrepreneurs need their MVPs like yesterday. With this in mind, what should developers do?

Read more

Your Web Image is Unnecessarily Bloated

By Christian Nwamba
Your Web Image is Unnecessarily Bloated

As a developer, it seems inefficient to serve a 2000kb JPEG image when we could compress images to optimize the performance without degrading the visual quality.

We are not new to this kind of responsibility. But our productivity will end up being questioned if we do not deliver fast. In order to do so, the community has devised several patterns to help improve productivity. Let's review few of these patterns based on their categories:

Read more

Google For Nigeria: We saw it all…

By Christian Nwamba
Google For Nigeria: We saw it all…

Note from Cloudinary: Christian Nwamba, a frequent Cloudinary contributor, recently attended, and was a main speaker, at the Google Developer Group (GDG) Conference in Lagos, Nigeria. Christian led a session teaching more than 500 developers how to “Build Offline Apps for the Next Billion Users.” The stack he used included JS (Vue), Firebase, Service Workers and Cloudinary. Below is his account of the conference and his talk.

Read more
Viral Images: Securing Images and Video uploads to your systems

When was the last time you got paid $40,000 for a few days of work? That is what happened last year to Russian independent security researcher Andrey Leonov, who discovered that if you upload a specially constructed image file to Facebook, you can make Facebook's internal servers, nested deep within their firewalls, run arbitrary commands to expose sensitive internal files in a way that could easily lead to a data breach.

Read more