Cloudinary Blog
Graphic designers often contemplate whether to add borders to their website elements. The decision of whether to add borders around frames, buttons and text elements really depends on the feeling the designer is trying to convey through the design. 
 
In this blog post we wanted to tell you about a new cloud-based transformation available through Cloudinary - adding borders to images. Yes, you can use CSS3 or image masks to simulate borders around images, but the first is supported only on modern browsers and the latter clutters the HTML. In addition, if you plan on embedding images in emails or documents you can pretty much say goodbye to borders (certainly for images with rounded corners). For such cases, you can use Cloudinary's extremely simple image transformation API to add borders directly to the original image.
 
Consider the following photo. It was uploaded to Cloudinary using 'autumn_leaves' as its public ID:
 
 
Adding a border around the image is straightforward. Simply specify the 'border' parameter ('bo' for URLs) using a CSS-like format. In the following example '4px_solid_black' means a 4 pixels wide black border.
 
 
 
 
Same example in Ruby on Rails:
Copy to clipboard
<% cl_image_tag("autumn_leaves.jpg", :width => 0.15, :crop => :scale, 
                :border => { :width => 4, :color => 'black' }) %>
 
The border's color component also accepts RGB format. The following example rounds the corners of the image using the 'radius' parameter ('r' for URLs) and adds a 6 pixels solid green border ('#00390b').
 
 
 
Same example in PHP:
Copy to clipboard
<?php echo cl_image_tag("autumn_leaves.jpg", array("width" => 0.15, "crop" => "scale", 
       "radius" => 20, "border" => array("width" => 6, "color" => "#00390b"))) ?>
 
Cloudinary also supports adding semi-transparent borders. This is accomplished using the RGBA color format. The Alpha hex value ranges between 00 (fully transparent), to FF (opaque). The following example generates a semi transparent 10 pixels wide green border. We also use Cloudinary's chained transformations to make the image elliptic ('max' radius), rotate the image by 5 degrees and add an underlay blue background image (while resizing it and increasing its brightness).
 
 
 
Same example in Django:
Copy to clipboard
import cloudinary
img = cloudinary.CloudinaryImage("autumn_leaves.jpg")
img.image(transformation=[
          dict(width=0.15, crop='scale', radius='max', 
               border=dict(width=10, color='#00390b60')), 
          dict(angle=5), 
          dict(underlay='site_bg', width=250, height=200, effects='brightness:50')])
And one last example - the following URL generates an image based on a Facebook profile picture that was automatically fetched by Cloudinary. The image is resized and rounded, and a black border is added. We then use an overlay to add Cloudinary's logo with a semi-transparent wide border. As with all of the Cloudinary managed images, the resulting image is persistently stored in the Cloud and then delivered and cached through a fast CDN.
 
.../demo/image/facebook/c_fill,w_150,h_180,r_10,bo_2px_solid_black/
l_cloudinary_logo_white,w_90,g_south_east,r_5,y_7,x_7,bo_6px_solid_rgb:afcee990/itail.jpg
 
 
By the way, you can also add the border as an incoming transformation so the original image is stored in the cloud already with the border. Here's such an incoming transformation, this time in Node.js:
Copy to clipboard
cloudinary.image("itail.jpg", { type: 'facebook', transformation: [
                 { crop: 'fill', width: 150, height: 180, radius: 10, 
                   border: { width: 2, color: 'black'}},
                 { overlay: 'cloudinary_logo_white', width: 90, 
                   gravity: 'south_east', radius: 5, y: 7, x: 7, 
                   border: { width: 6, color: '#afcee990'}}]})

Summary

If you are a regular reader of our blog, you know that Cloudinary keeps enhancing on various fronts. One of these fronts is our ever increasing set of image manipulation capabilities. In this blog we introduced a cool new enhancement that you might find useful. We have more in our pipeline. If you want to see a new image manipulation capability added to Cloudinary, just drop us a line.

Recent Blog Posts

Transitioning JPEG-Based to JPEG XL-Based Images for Web Platforms

When the JPEG codec was being developed in the late 1980s, no standardized, lossy image-compression formats existed. JPEG became ready at exactly the right time in 1992, when the World Wide Web and digital cameras were about to become a thing. The introduction of HTML’s <img> tag in 1995 ensured the recognition of JPEG as the web format—at least for photographs. During the 1990s, digital cameras replaced analog ones and, given the limited memory capacities of that era, JPEG became the standard format for photography, especially for consumer-grade cameras.

Read more

Amplify Your Jamstack With Video

By Alex Patterson
Amplify Your Jamstack With Cloudinary Video

As defined by Amazon Web Services (AWS), Amplify is a set of products and tools with which mobile and front-end web developers can build and deploy AWS-powered, secure, and scalable full-stack apps. Also, you can efficiently configure their back ends, connect them to your app with just a few lines of code, and deploy static web apps in only three steps. Historically, because of their performance issues, managing images and videos is a daunting challenge for developers. Even though you can easily load media to an S3 bucket with AWS Amplify, transforming, compressing, and responsively delivering them is labor intensive and time consuming.

Read more
Cloudinary Helps Move James Hardie’s Experience Online

While COVID has affected most businesses, it has been particularly hard on those that sell products for the physical ‘brick and mortar’ world. One company that literally fits that bill is our Australian customer James Hardie, the largest global manufacturer of fibre cement products used in both domestic and commercial construction. These are materials that its buyers ideally want to see up close, in detail. When customers have questions, they expect personal service.

Read more
How to Build an Enhanced Gravatar Service, Part 2

Part 1 of this post defines the capabilities of an enhanced Gravatar service, which I named Clavatar, and describes the following initial steps for building it:

This post, part 2 of the series, explains how to make Clavatar work like Gravatar and to develop Clavatar’s capabilities of enabling requests for various versions of the images related to user accounts.

Read more