Cloudinary Blog

Heroku add-on for image management in the cloud

When we first started developing web apps with Ruby on Rails, some six years ago, we struggled with finding a good IDE. We settled for Eclipse with RadRails (still developing on PCs at that time...), but kept our eyes open for new and promising IDEs. At late 2007, a very surprising contender caught our eyes, it was called ‘Heroku’ and it offered an amazing concept - a fully featured IDE for Ruby-on-Rails that was completely online, available through your favorite browser.

In addition to collaborative online code editing, Heroku sought to revolutionize the way you deploy your Rails applications. Instead of messing around with a lengthy deployment process, heroku offered to deploy your Rails applications to the cloud in just a few clicks.

The huge benefits for the Rails community has drove Heroku to focus its whole attention at Cloud-based deployments, offering one of the most effective PaaS (Platform as a service) solutions at that time. Heroku soon extended their support to Node.js, Clojure, Java, Python, and Scala.

Two years later, Heroku added yet another disruptive feature to their platform - add-ons. With add-ons, any cloud service provider could integrate with Heroku, offering its service through the Heroku platform. New add-ons get listed on Heroku’s portal, and Heroku users can extend their existing applications with new cloud services in virtually one click.

When we started working on Cloudinary, we knew that we must develop a Cloudinary add-on for Heroku. Allowing web developers to integrate with our Cloud-based image management solution with just a single click was simply a too important opportunity to miss. 

After a lengthy testing phase, we’re happy to report that the Cloudinary’s Heroku add-on is finally available to the general public

Notes

To setup a Cloudinary account, simply select the plan that matches your needs from the list of plans. You can upgrade to plans with higher usage limits at any time.

You can also do it from the command line. For example, the following line signs up to the Bronze plan:

heroku addons:add cloudinary:bronze

With Cloudinary’s client libraries for Ruby on Rails, Node.js and Python, integrating with Heroku is quite seamless. Heroku automatically defines the CLOUDINARY_URL environment variable in your deployed applications. This variable is processed by our client libraries for configuring your cloud name and access identifiers. Here is a sample CLOUDINARY_URL for example:

cloudinary://123456789012345:abcdeghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz12@n07t21i7

In addition, Cloudinary also offers straightforward URL-based APIs for simple integration with any web development platform out there.

Check out our Heroku documentation page for detailed usage instructions.  

After you setup your Cloudinary add-on, make sure you check out our Management Console. Through the console you can browse all uploaded images and transformations, view usage statistics and charts, grab your access identifiers and modify your account settings. To reach your management console, just head to the Heroku portal, select your app, and select Cloudinary from the Add-ons drop-down menu on the top right corner. 

Heroku Menu

Console

Heroku users - why don't you try out our new add-on? We would love to hear your feedback.

Recent Blog Posts

A Guide to Website Image Optimization and Performance

Part 1 of this series delves into the background for this guide. Here in part 2 are the ins and outs.

Wait, hear me out. I know, we just talked about this: Nobody is sheepishly pleading you, “Please, might we have just one more image on the page?” No, I’m not telling you to pick that particular fight. Instead, use a little smoke and mirrors to avoid requests for images that your audience needn’t render right away and might never need at all while loading them asynchronously—only as needed.

Read more
A Guide to Image Optimization for Website Performance

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about the rules of putting images on the web.

For such a flexible medium as the web, software development can feel like a painstaking, rules-oriented game—an errant comma might break a build, a missing semicolon might wipe out an entire page. For a long time, the laws of image rendering seemed similarly cut-and-dry: For example, if your markups contained an img element , the singular content of its src attribute would be foisted on the audience regardless of their browsing context, period.

Read more
Digital Asset Management Platform: Meeting Customer Expectations

Consumers today expect media-rich experiences. No longer a novelty, it’s second nature to swipe through multiple photos on mobile apps, zoom in on product images for a closer look, visualize online travel reviews, socialize cool video clips while browsing, and encounter brand messages when walking into brick-and-mortar stores. These experiences weave together visual cues and clues with relevant content to create meaning and more authentic connections for customers.

Read more
How to Customize Cloudinary's eCommerce Android App

Recently we added the Cloudinary Demo - eCommerce App to the Google Play Store. This app demonstrates the best practices for optimal delivery of images on a storefront, including category pages, product pages, and a shopping cart. At the time, we published Introducing the Cloudinary Demo Android App, Part 1, which provided an under-the-hood tour of how the eCommerce Android App was designed and how Cloudinary was integrated throughout.

Read more