Cloudinary Blog

Laravel File Upload to a Local Server Or to the Cloud

Laravel File Upload to a Local Server Or to the Cloud

Currently, Laravel is the most renowned PHP framework, boasting of a large developer community; several open-source packages, such as Cashier, Sanctum, Scout, and Telescope; and a host of paid platforms, e.g., Laravel Forge, Envoyer, and Vapor. Laravel Forge & Envoyer ably supports deployment and use of Laravel production-based apps.


Introducing Cloudinary’s Laravel SDK. Learn the benefits and capabilities of the Laravel PHP framework and the way to upload to and transform files.


The sections below walk you through the process of setting up Laravel file uploads.

How to Optimize for Page Load Speed

Set Up a Laravel Project

  1. Install Composer and PHP on your development or production machine and then run this command:

    Copy to clipboard
    composer create-project --prefer-dist laravel/laravel upload
  2. Go to the upload directory and rename the env.example file to .env.

  3. Run the project with the command php artisan serve.

Your Laravel project is now up and running.

Set Up the Mechanics for File Uploads

  1. Create a file-upload controller (FileUpload Controller) in your project:

    Copy to clipboard
    php artisan make:controller FileUploadController
  2. Open the FileUploadController.php file and add a method for displaying the upload form:

    Copy to clipboard
    <?php
    namespace App\Http\Controllers;
    use Illuminate\Http\Request;
    
    class FileUploadController extends Controller
    {
        public function showUploadForm()
        {
            return view('upload');
        }
    }
  3. Create an upload.blade.php file in the resources/views directory and populate the file with the code below:

    Copy to clipboard
    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    
        <title>Laravel File Upload</title>
    
        <!-- Fonts -->
        <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Nunito:200,600" rel="stylesheet">
    
        <!-- Styles -->
        <style>
            html, body {
                background-color: #fff;
                color: #636b6f;
                font-family: 'Nunito', sans-serif;
                font-weight: 200;
                height: 100vh;
                margin: 0;
            }
    
            .full-height {
                height: 100vh;
            }
    
            .flex-center {
                align-items: center;
                display: flex;
                justify-content: center;
            }
    
            .position-ref {
                position: relative;
            }
    
            .top-right {
                position: absolute;
                right: 10px;
                top: 18px;
            }
    
            .content {
                text-align: center;
            }
    
            .title {
                font-size: 84px;
            }
    
            .links > a {
                color: #636b6f;
                padding: 0 25px;
                font-size: 13px;
                font-weight: 600;
                letter-spacing: .1rem;
                text-decoration: none;
                text-transform: uppercase;
            }
    
            .m-b-md {
                margin-bottom: 30px;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class="flex-center position-ref full-height">
            <div class="content">
                <div class="title m-b-md">
                    Laravel File Upload
                </div>
    
                @if ($message = Session::get('success'))
                    <div class="alert alert-success alert-block">
                        <button type="button" class="close" data-dismiss="alert">×</button>
                            <strong>{{ $message }}</strong>
                    </div>
                @endif
    
                <div class="links">
                     <form action="/upload" method="POST" enctype="multipart/form-data">
                        @csrf
                        <div class="row">
    
                            <div class="col-md-6">
                                <input type="file" name="file" class="form-control">
                            </div>
    
                            <div class="col-md-6">
                                <button type="submit" class="btn btn-success">Upload a File</button>
                            </div>
    
                        </div>
                    </form>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
    </html>

    The code above displays the form along with a confirmation message if the upload succeeded. Concurrently, the file-upload controller posts the form data to a /upload route in the routes/web.php file. Note: The related code will be shown later in this post.

  4. Go to the routes/web.php directory and add two routes: one to display the form and the other to process the file upload:

    Copy to clipboard
    Route::get('/upload', 'FileUploadController@showUploadForm');
    Route::post('/upload', 'FileUploadController@storeUploads');

Now reload the app and go to the /upload route. This page is displayed:

laravel file upload

Process the Uploads

Next, ensure that uploaded files are stored though the form by adding a storeUploads method to the FileUploadController.php file, as follows:

Copy to clipboard
….
public function storeUploads(Request $request)
    {
        $request->file('file')->store('images');

        return back()
            ->with('success', 'File uploaded successfully');
    }

The code above grabs the file uploaded through the POST request, creates on your local service an images directory, and stores the file there.

Test it: upload a file for your app and see if the file is in the storage/app/images directory.

Note: For more details on a recently uploaded file, call these methods:

Copy to clipboard
 $fileName = $request->file('file')->getClientOriginalName();
 $extension = $request->file('file')->extension();
 $mime = $request->file('file')->getMimeType();
 $clientSize = $request->file('file')->getSize();

Set Up File Uploads to Cloudinary

Uploading files to the local disk and serving them yourself is rife with limitations, a major one being the lack of scalability. Best to outsource to an external service like Cloudinary, which, besides upload and storage capabilities, offers features for manipulating and managing media, including images, videos, audio, and other emerging types.

To enable file uploads to Cloudinary:

  1. Sign up for a free Cloudinary account, log in, and note your cloud name and API keys from the dashboard.

    media library

  2. Install Cloudinary’s Laravel SDK:

    Copy to clipboard
    composer require cloudinary-labs/cloudinary-laravel

    Note: Please follow the instructions in the #Installation section. Ensure you publish the config file and add your credentials to the .env file of your app.

  3. Rewrite the file-upload controller (FileUploadController.php) for straight uploads to the cloud:

    Copy to clipboard
    <?php
    namespace App\Http\Controllers;
    use Illuminate\Http\Request;
    
    class FileUploadController extends Controller
    {
        public function showUploadForm()
        {
            return view('upload');
        }
    
        public function storeUploads(Request $request)
        {
            $response = cloudinary()->upload($request->file('file')->getRealPath())->getSecurePath();
    
            dd($response);
    
            return back()
                ->with('success', 'File uploaded successfully');
        }
    }

    The code above uploads the file straight to your Cloudinary account and returns the image URL by utilizing the cloudinary() helper function. We didn’t have to use the Cloudinary Facade.

Note: Be sure to replace <your-cloud-name>, <your-api-keys>, and <your-api-secret> with their values from your dashboard. Furthermore, for security while in production environments, always load those credentials from the environment variables. That is, invoke the config method to load the credentials before uploading the file to Cloudinary. dd($response) then dumps the response returned from Cloudinary for the uploaded file. Here’s an example of a response:

You can now store the returned URL in the database, and display the image to users anywhere in your app.

Leverage More Cloudinary Capabilities

Uploading files barely scratches the surface of media management. Cloudinary helps you administer the entire spectrum of your media’s lifecycle, end to end, from upload and transformation to optimization and delivery. Do check it out.

Want to Learn More About File Uploads?

Recent Blog Posts

On-Demand Viewing of Live Video Presents New Opportunities

In early 2020, Cloudinary was planning its fourth annual ImageCon conference, a two-day event in the heart of San Francisco, where we’d congregate with curious digital-media minds to brainstorm best practices for media management. Instead, the COVID-19 pandemic forced the entirety of ImageCon 2020 online. As with all other events being planned, we had to overhaul the content to be communicated on video. Gratifyingly, we found the right partner—the event platform Bizzabo—to turn that into a reality.

Read more
Why the Future of E-commerce Is Live

In a previous post, I discussed how “going live” is gaining popularity across industries and verticals. What began as a way for gamers to jam together has evolved into a medium for broader entertainment and business purposes. To continue the conversation, this post unpacks the current trends of shoppable live streams to shine a light on how brands are leveraging “lives” to connect with shoppers in new ways.

Read more
An Overview of Live-Streaming Video Trends

“Let’s go live.” For decades, that’s what newscasters say as they cut to real-time footage of a colleague reporting in the field. The live-video feed adds visual interest and perspective to a story beyond what can be communicated by someone sitting behind the news desk. In the same way, live-streaming video nowadays adds context to other consumer environments. From gaming and events to shopping and social media, “going live” enhances everyday experiences, and it’s something anyone can do with relative ease.

Read more
Readying Live Streams for Video on Demand

When planning a live broadcast or stream, companies often overlook the redistribution phase, but live-stream videos are useful well beyond their initial streaming. Why? Because not everyone watches the first run. For a wider audience, it makes sense to repost live content on your website under an “events” tab, on YouTube, and other social sites for video on demand (VOD). However, preparing footage for reposting can be a lot of work.

Read more