Cloudinary Blog

log posts of 'SDK' tag
Build a WhatsApp Clone with Automatic Image Optimization

In the previous post, we showed how to upload images to a Cloudinary server. In this part, we will play with some of the features we see on the WhatsApp technology. After you or your users have uploaded image assets to Cloudinary, you can deliver them via dynamic URLs. You can include instructions in your dynamic URLs that tell Cloudinary to manipulate your assets using a set of transformation parameters. All image manipulations and image optimizations are performed automatically in the cloud and your transformed assets are automatically optimized before they are routed through a fast CDN to the end user for an optimal user experience. For example, you can resize and crop, add overlays, blur or pixelate faces, apply a variety of special effects and filters, and apply settings to optimize your images and to deliver them responsively.

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Impressed by WhatsApp Tech? Build WhatsApp Clone with Media Upload

With more than one billion people using WhatsApp, the platform is becoming a go-to for reliable and secure instant messaging. Having so many users means that data transfer processes must be optimized and scalable across all platforms. WhatsApp is touted for its ability to achieve significant media quality preservation when traversing the network from sender to receiver, and this is no easy feat to achieve.

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Address mobile challenges with the Cloudinary Android SDK

Developing applications for mobile consumption requires facing, and overcoming, some difficult challenges. Apps need to limit their RAM, CPU and battery usage while still performing the required tasks in a reasonable time frame. If too many background tasks are running, the mobile device can become sluggish, with the battery running out very quickly. Coordination with other apps is crucial to keep the device responsive and make the battery last longer.

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Easy upload and display images in your app with iOS SDK

Embedding and managing images and other media content in a mobile application is always challenging. The processes of downloading a media file from the web, storing it on the device, and then displaying it to the user are surprisingly and often frustratingly complex from a coding perspective. In addition, you probably want to add code that enables reusing images rather than downloading it every time, but you have to be smart about it to avoid clogging the precious storage space on your customer's device. Furthermore, your design probably requires that images be displayed in different sizes and DPRs in different devices, but creating and maintaining multiple versions of every image manually is virtually impossible.

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