Cloudinary Blog

Delivering all your websites’ images through a CDN

Delivering all your website images through a CDN
Most leading blogs deliver their assets (images, JS, CSS, etc.) through state-of-the-art CDNs and utilize online resizing technologies. With faster, off-site access, they greatly improve their users’ browsing experience, while reducing load on their servers.
 
Using Cloudinary you can use these same technologies today, in your website or blog, without any hassle. Simply direct all your images to Cloudinary and they would be delivered to your visitors through Amazon’s powerful CDN network. You can even add alternative dimensions to your images’ URL and get your pictures in any desired size or perspective. All of this with minimum changes on your side.
 
UPDATE - March 2013: All Cloudinary images are delivered via the leading worldwide CDN of Akamai.

UPDATE - November 2016: Customers of the higher Cloudinary plans can choose between Akamai, CloudFront, or Fastly, or even take advantage of smart CDN selection or dynamic multi-CDN switching. For more details, see the multi-CDN blog post.
 
How it’s done? Simply prefix all your images with:
 
https://res.cloudinary.com/<your cloudinary cloud name>/image/fetch/

 
Here's a quick example:
Jennifer Lawrence

Both URLs return the exact same image, only the second one is cached and delivered through fast, localized CDNs and not via your local web server. Better experience to your users. Lower load on your server. Lower hosting costs.
 
Note: that 'demo' in all the URLs should be replaced with your Cloudinary’s cloud name. Click here to set up one in seconds.
 
You can use this method to create different sized thumbnails for the same photo. For example, creating a 150x150 crop focused on Jennifer’s face ('g_face') and with rounded corners of 20 pixels ('r_20') generates the following beautiful image:
 

150x150 Jennifer Lawrence
 
Nice, isn’t it :) see our docs of image transformations for plenty more options.
 
If you are a developer, you can do the same from code. For example, in Ruby on Rails:
 
cl_image_tag("http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/" +
                       "Jennifer_Lawrence_at_the_83rd_Academy_Awards.jpg",
                       :type => :fetch, :width => 150, :height => 150,
                       :crop => :thumb, :gravity => :face, :radius => 20)
 
Note that if the image behind the original URL changes, Cloudinary will automatically update the images embedded in your site and all its resized versions.
 
To summarize, any blogger and any website owner can now deliver its website’s images through a CDN and seamlessly create smartly resized and cropped images in any dimension. All that by just adding the Cloudinary resource URL as a prefix to all images.

Recent Blog Posts

Build a PDF Viewer with Vue.js and Cloudinary

Cloudinary offers an interesting feature: The ability to generate images from the PDF files and pages. With Cloudinary, you can create thumbnail images of your documents for previewing purposes. It's useful when you don't want to grant user access to the content, but need to give them a sneak peek of what they're missing if they haven’t downloaded the PDF yet.

Read more
Responsive Images Guide Part 3: Variable Image Encoding

Welcome to the latest edition of the Responsive Images Guide!

In part 1, I laid out the big idea: a responsive image is a variable image – which adjusts itself to fit variable contexts.

In part 2, we looked at the most common way that an image can do exactly that: scaling itself up and down to fit viewports of different sizes and screens with different densities.

Read more
Generate Waveform Images from Audio with Cloudinary

This is a reposting of an article written by David Walsh. Check out his blog HERE!
I've been working a lot with visualizations lately, which is a far cry from your normal webpage element interaction coding; you need advanced geometry knowledge, render and performance knowledge, and much more. It's been a great learning experience but it can be challenging and isn't always an interest of all web developers. That's why we use apps and services specializing in complex tasks like Cloudinary: we need it done quickly and by a tool written by an expert.

Read more