Cloudinary Blog

Cloudinary Offers Support for sonar Tool

Cloudinary offers support for sonar tool

Cloudinary is now supporting the sonar tool, an open source platform that aims to bring together best practices for web developers.

What is sonar?

sonar is a linting tool for the web that was developed out of Microsoft's Edge team. The code for the project was donated to the JS Foundation and development is open and looking for input from anyone in the web community, such as browser vendors, web experts and developers.

There are four primary goals for sonar:

  • Use the community to identify key web development best practices

  • Provide tools that help web developers write the best possible code

  • Help identify issues in existing code that do not adhere to current best practices

  • Promote community tools and services that drive web development best practices

Currently sonar supports jsdom, Chrome and Edge 15 web browsers, and expect to add support for Firefox soon. sonar is also integrating other best-in-class tools and services, such as aXe for accessibility and SSL Server Test for checking the certificate configuration.

Cloudinary Helps Assess Site Speed

sonar's scanner tool currently tests the following for web sites:

  1. Accessibility of the website to serve users with impairments or disabilities

  2. Interoperability with of the site with different browsers

  3. Performance for fast page load time

  4. Progressive Web Apps tests the interactions of the site with iOS touch icon and mobile software that supports the web app manifest file.   

  5. Security for various disallowed headers and vulnerabilities.

Cloudinary is providing some functionality under the Performance section of sonar scanner that was originally built for Cloudinary's website speed assessment tool. Specifically for sonar tool, Cloudinary is providing advanced algorithms that demonstrate how changes - such as image size, format, quality and encoding parameters - can deliver significant reductions in file size while maintaining perceived quality and ultimately making websites run faster in any browser.

sonar Tool

The results will display/drill into each image that could benefit from an optimization and what the estimated compression savings could result in.

sonar Tool

sonar Tool

sonar Tool

You can use this rule in the online site scan or via the command line as part of the latest version of sonar tool (0.12.2).

We are very excited to participate in the program with the sonar team. We hope all Cloudinary users and community members will visit the sonar project, and take a look to see just how valuable it could be in helping maintain best practices for web development. For more information about sonar tool, read through their blog post on the scanner tool here, check out their website, GitHub repo or follow them on Twitter at @narwhalnellie.

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